Archive of Sediment Data from Vibracores Collected in 2016 from Fire Island, New York

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Frequently anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title:
Archive of Sediment Data from Vibracores Collected in 2016 from Fire Island, New York
Abstract:
Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a long-term coastal morphologic-change study at Fire Island, New York, prior to and after Hurricane Sandy impacted the area in October 2012. The Fire Island Coastal Change project objectives include understanding the morphologic evolution of the barrier island system on a variety of time scales (months to centuries) and resolving storm-related impacts, post-storm beach response, and recovery. In April 2016, scientists from the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) conducted sediment sampling and geophysical surveys on Fire Island to characterize and quantify spatial variability in the subaerial geology with the goal of subsequently integrating onshore geology with other surf zone and nearshore datasets. Data release doi:10.5066/F7FN15GX associated with this metadata record serves as an archive of sediment data from 14 vibracores collected on April 10 and 11, 2016 (USGS Field Activity Number [FAN] 2016-322-FA) along 6 transects at Fire Island, New York, that extend from the upper to lower subaerial shoreface. Sedimentologic and stratigraphic metrics (for example, sediment texture or unit thicknesses) derived from these data can be used to assess spatial and temporal trends and may aid in understanding beach evolution. Data collection and processing methods are described in Data Series 1100. Data products, including sample location tables, descriptive core logs, core photographs, results of sediment grain-size analyses, and geographic information system (GIS) data files with accompanying formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata, can be downloaded from https://doi.org/10.5066/F7FN15GX.
Supplemental_Information:
On April 10 and 11, 2016, USGS scientists collected 14 vibracores along 6 transects at Fire Island, New York, that extend from the upper to lower subaerial shoreface (USGS FAN 2016-322-FA). Ground penetrating radar (GPR) and differential global positioning system (DGPS) data were also collected during the same survey as part of ongoing research investigating post-Hurricane Sandy beach response and recovery; those data are published separately (Forde and others, 2018).
  1. How might this data set be cited?
    Bernier, Julie C., Buster, Noreen A., Brenner, Owen T., Kelso, Kyle W., Tuten, Thomas M., and Miselis, Jennifer L., 2018, Archive of Sediment Data from Vibracores Collected in 2016 from Fire Island, New York:.

    Online Links:

    This is part of the following larger work.

    Buster, Noreen A., Bernier, Julie C., Brenner, Owen T., Kelso, Kyle W., Tuten, Thomas M., and Miselis, Jennifer L., 2018, Sediment Data from Vibracores Collected in 2016 from Fire Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Data Series DS 1100, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg, FL.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?
    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -73.15614
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -72.93323
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 40.71391
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 40.63996
  3. What does it look like?
  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?
    Beginning_Date: 10-Apr-2016
    Ending_Date: 11-Apr-2016
    Currentness_Reference:
    Ground condition
  5. What is the general form of this data set?
    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: Multimedia presentation
  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?
    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?
      This is a Vector data set. It contains the following vector data types (SDTS terminology):
      • Point (14)
    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?
      Grid_Coordinate_System_Name: Universal Transverse Mercator
      Universal_Transverse_Mercator:
      UTM_Zone_Number: 18
      Transverse_Mercator:
      Scale_Factor_at_Central_Meridian: 0.9996
      Longitude_of_Central_Meridian: 87.0
      Latitude_of_Projection_Origin: 0.0
      False_Easting: 500000.0
      False_Northing: 0.0
      Planar coordinates are encoded using coordinate pair
      Abscissae (x-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 0.001
      Ordinates (y-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 0.001
      Planar coordinates are specified in Meters
      The horizontal datum used is D North American 1983.
      The ellipsoid used is GRS 1980.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378137.0.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/298.257222101.
      Vertical_Coordinate_System_Definition:
      Altitude_System_Definition:
      Altitude_Datum_Name: North American Vertical Datum of 1988
      Altitude_Resolution: 0.001
      Altitude_Distance_Units: Meters
      Altitude_Encoding_Method: Attribute values
  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?
    2016-322-FA_VibracoreSites
    Files defining the site locations and selected core metrics for vibracores collected in April 2016 from Fire Island, New York (USGS FAN 2016-322-FA). Files are provided in Microsoft Excel (.xlsx), comma-separated values (.csv), Esri shapefile (.shp), and Keyhole Markup Language (KML) formats. (Source: USGS)
    FID
    Internal feature number (Source: Esri) Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated
    Shape
    Feature geometry (Source: Esri) Geometry type defining the features
    Core_ID
    Core identification number (Source: USGS) Character string
    Date_Coll
    Date core was collected (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:04/10/2016
    Maximum:04/11/2016
    NAD83_lat
    Latitude of site location, in decimal degrees (NAD83) (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:40.64370
    Maximum:40.71016
    Units:Decimal degrees
    Resolution:0.00001
    NAD83_lon
    Longitude of site location, in decimal degrees (NAD83) (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:-73.15614
    Maximum:-72.93323
    Units:Decimal degrees
    Resolution:0.00001
    NAD83_X
    X-coordinate (easting) of site location, in meters (NAD83, UTM zone 18 N) (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:655907.208
    Maximum:674583.461
    Units:Meters
    Resolution:0.001
    NAD83_Y
    Y-coordinate (northing) of site location, in meters (NAD83, UTM zone 18 N) (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:4500839.574
    Maximum:4508637.080
    Units:Meters
    Resolution:0.001
    NAD83_Ell
    Ellipsoid height of site location, in meters (NAD83) (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:-30.739
    Maximum:-28.482
    Units:Meters
    Resolution:0.001
    CumErr_Ell
    Estimated cumulative vertical error, in meters (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:0.014
    Maximum:0.037
    Units:Meters
    Resolution:0.001
    NAVD88G12A
    Elevation (orthometric height) of site location, in meters (NAD83, GEOID 12A) (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:-0.948
    Maximum:3.216
    Units:Meters
    Resolution:0.001
    Location
    Cross-shore beach profile along which vibracore was collected (https://coastal.er.usgs.gov/fire-island/research/sandy/beach-profiles.html). (Source: USGS) Character string
    Location2
    Relative position along cross-shore beach profile at which vibracore was collected (dune toe, upper beach, lower beach). (Source: USGS) Character string
    Prof_Dist
    Distance, in meters, along beach profile at which vibracore was collected. (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:20
    Maximum:60
    Units:Meters
    Resolution:1.0
    Length_cm
    Core length, in centimeters (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:71.0
    Maximum:171.0
    Units:Centimeters
    Resolution:0.5
    Compaction_cm
    Core compaction, in centimeters. "N/A" (not applicable) indicates no compaction measurement. (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:-0.5
    Maximum:74.0
    Units:Centimeters
    Resolution:0.5
    Penetration_cm
    Depth core penetrated below the sediment surface, in centimeters. This is equal to core length plus core compaction. (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:98.5
    Maximum:199.0
    Units:Centimeters
    Resolution:0.5
    Comment
    Additional site or core information (Source: USGS) Character string
    2016-322-FA_GrrainSize_SumStats
    Summary grain-size data for sediment samples from vibracores collected from Fire Island, New York, in April 2016 (USGS FAN 2016-322-FA). Files are provided in Microsoft Excel (.xlsx) and comma-separated values (.csv) formats. The averaged results for all samples, including the number of runs used, the standard deviation of the averaged results, and down-core plots, are provided for each core on its own tab. (Source: USGS)
    Entity_and_Attribute_Overview:
    The detailed attribute descriptions for the summary statistics workbooks are provided in the included data dictionary (2016-322-FA_Grain_Size_DataDictionary.pdf). These metadata are not complete without this file.
    Entity_and_Attribute_Detail_Citation:
    Data dictionary for grain-size data tables, in: Bernier, J.C., Buster, N.A., Brenner, O.T., Kelso, K.K., Tuten, T.M., and Miselis, J.L., 2018, Archive of Sediment Data Collected in 2016 from Fire Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Data Release, https://doi.org/10.5066/F7FN15GX.

Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)
    • Julie C. Bernier
    • Noreen A. Buster
    • Owen T. Brenner
    • Kyle W. Kelso
    • Thomas M. Tuten
    • Jennifer L. Miselis
  2. Who also contributed to the data set?
    U.S. Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Geology Program, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center
  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Julie C. Bernier
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov

Why was the data set created?

Dissemination of processed sediment data from vibracores collected from Fire Island, New York, in April 2016 (USGS FAN 2016-322-FA).

How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?
  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?
    Date: 2016 (process 1 of 8)
    USGS scientists collected 14 vibracores on April 10 and 11, 2016 (USGS FAN 2016-322-FA) along 6 transects at Fire Island, New York that extend from the upper to lower subaerial shoreface. Core sites were selected where analysis of previously-surveyed beach-profile data (https://coastal.er.usgs.gov/fire-island/research/sandy/beach-profiles.html) indicated recovery of sediments from below the post-Hurricane Sandy surface was possible. The coring transects correspond to the locations of beach profiles 10, 11, 22, 25, 26, and 29. Vibracores were collected using an 8-horsepower Briggs and Stratton motor connected via an 8.5-meter-long (27.9-foot-long) shaft to a Dreyer 2 1/8-inch (5.4 cm) concrete vibrator head. The vibrator was attached to a 7.6-cm (3-inch) diameter aluminum core barrel using a quick-release clamp, and the core barrel was vibrated into the subsurface until refusal. Measurements were taken on the inside and outside of the core barrel prior to extraction to determine compaction or core shortening values, which is the difference between the recovered core length and the total depth the core barrel penetrated below the sediment surface. After extraction, each core was capped, sealed, and labeled with the core number and orientation. All cores were transported to the SPCMC sediment laboratory for processing and analysis. Person who carried out this activity:
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Julie C. Bernier
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov
    Date: 2016 (process 2 of 8)
    All vibracore locations were recorded at the time of collection using a Garmin GPSMAP 76S handheld GPS receiver. Position and elevation data were also recorded with an Ashtech Z-Xtreme DGPS receiver and geodetic antenna, which recorded the 12-channel full-carrier-phase satellite positioning signals (L1/L2) and provided more accurate horizontal and vertical control than handheld GPS units. A stop-and-go rapid-static survey technique was used, with a static occupation duration of 5 minutes at each sample site. DGPS data were recorded concurrently throughout the survey using a similar instrument combination (Ashtech receiver and Thales choke ring antenna) at a base station set up on the NPS REST benchmark. Person who carried out this activity:
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Julie C. Bernier
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov
    Date: 2016 (process 3 of 8)
    Base station data were post-processed through OPUS, and the time-weighted position calculated from all base-xstation occupations did not differ significantly from the NPS REST control coordinates; therefore, the control coordinates were used for post-processing. The base-station coordinates were imported into GrafNav, version 8.5 (NovAtel Waypoint Product Group), and the data from the rover GPS (the GPS unit used to collect data at each vibracore site) were post-processed to the concurrent base-station session data; baseline distances for all core sites were 21 km or less. The GPS data were acquired and processed in the World Geodetic System of 1984 (WGS84) (G1150) geodetic datum. Person who carried out this activity:
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Julie C. Bernier
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov
    Date: 2016 (process 4 of 8)
    Using the NGS transformation software packages Horizontal Time-Dependent Positioning (HTDP, https://www.ngs.noaa.gov/TOOLS/Htdp/Htdp.shtml), version 3.2.5 and VDatum, version 3.4 (https://vdatum.noaa.gov/), the sample locations were transformed from the GPS processing datum (WGS84) to the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83), Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) Zone 18 North (18N) reference frame and the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88) orthometric elevation using the NGS geoid model of 2012(A) (GEOID12A). Person who carried out this activity:
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Julie C. Bernier
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov
    Data sources produced in this process:
    • 2016-322-FA_CoreSites.zip
    Date: 2017 (process 5 of 8)
    At the SPCMSC sediment laboratory, each vibracore was split lengthwise, photographed with a Canon Powershot SX20 IS digital camera, described macroscopically using standard sediment-logging methods, and subsampled for grain-size analysis. Grain-size samples consisted of 2-cm sections sampled at varying intervals down-core depending on the number and thickness of the observed sedimentologic units. Textural descriptions for the core logs are based on macroscopic observations; the quantitative grain-size data are represented by down-core plots on the core logs. Sediment color is based on the Munsell soil color system (https://munsell.com/color-products/color-communications-products/environmental-color-communication/munsell-soil-color-charts/). Person who carried out this activity:
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Julie C. Bernier
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov
    Data sources produced in this process:
    • 2016-322-FA_CoreLogs.pdf
    Date: 2017 (process 6 of 8)
    Grain-size analyses were performed using a Coulter LS 13 320 particle-size analyzer, which uses laser diffraction to measure the size distribution of sediments ranging in size from 0.4 microns (µm) to 2 millimeters (mm) (clay to very coarse-grained sand). A total of 315 samples were analyzed from 14 vibracores. Prior to analysis, each sample was dried at 40 degrees Celsius (°C) for 24 hours. Two subsamples (sets) from each sample were processed (4 runs per set) through the LS 13 320 particle-size analyzer, which measures the particle-size distribution of each sample by passing sediment suspended in solution between two narrow panes of glass in front of a laser. Light is scattered by the particles into characteristic refraction patterns measured by an array of photodetectors as intensity per unit area and recorded as relative volume for 92 size-related channels (bins). In order to prevent shell fragments and coarse material from damaging the LS 13 320, particles greater than 2 mm in diameter were separated from each subsample prior to analysis using a number 10 (2,000 µm, 2 mm) U.S. standard sieve, which meets the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E11 standard specifications for determining particle size using woven-wire test sieves, and the fraction of sediment greater than 2 mm was recorded as a percentage of the subsample dry weight. Person who carried out this activity:
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Julie C. Bernier
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov
    Date: 2017 (process 7 of 8)
    The raw grain-size data were run through GRADISTAT, version 8 (Blott and Pye, 2001), which calculates the geometric (in metric units) and logarithmic (in phi units, Φ) mean, sorting, skewness, and kurtosis of each sample using the Folk and Ward method as well as the cumulative particle-size distribution. GRADISTAT also calculates the fraction of sediment from each sample by size category (for example, clay, coarse silt, fine sand) based on a modified Wentworth size scale. A macro developed by the USGS was applied to calculate the average and standard deviation of each sample (four runs per set, eight runs per sample) and highlight runs that varied from the set or sample average by more than plus or minus (±) 1.5 standard deviations. Excessive deviations from the mean are likely the result of equipment error or extraneous material in the sample and, therefore, are not considered representative of the sample. Those runs were removed from the results and the sample average was recalculated using the remaining runs. The individual run statistics are available at https://coastal.er.usgs.gov/data-release/doi-F7FN15GX/data/2016-322-FA_GrainSize_RunStats.zip. The averaged results for all samples, including the number of runs used, the standard deviation of the averaged results, and graphical representations of the data, are summarized in Microsoft Excel workbooks with each core on its own tab and are available at https://coastal.er.usgs.gov/data-release/doi-F7FN15GX/data/2016-322-FA_GrainSize_SumStats.zip. Person who carried out this activity:
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Julie C. Bernier
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov
    Data sources produced in this process:
    • 2016-322-FA_GrainSize_SumStats.zip
    • 2016-322-FA_GrainSize_RunStats.zip
    Date: 2018 (process 8 of 8)
    Using Exchangeable image file format (Exif) data, the GPS date, time and coordinates recorded during sediment core collection were embedded in the core photograph's image metadata. The Exif headers were initially populated by the camera’s imaging software but were subsequently updated by USGS staff to include core-related supplemental information. A Python version 2.7.3 script (UpdatePhotoEXIFv2.py) was run to incorporate location information and auxiliary details into the appropriate locations within the Exif header of each full-resolution JPEG image. The Python script used ExifTool version 10.25 to write the information to the image headers. The following tags were populated in the JPEG image headers. Information is duplicated in some tags. This was done because different software packages access different tags.
    GPS tags: The values populated are unique for each image and based on the post-processed DGPS position information.
    GPSLatitudeRef
    GPSLatitude
    GPSLongitudeRef
    GPSLongitude
    GPSTimeStamp
    GSPDateStamp
    
    
    JPEG tags: The tag is listed along with the information used to populate it - which is the same for every image taken with a particular camera. The following information is based on the Canon PowerShot SX20 IS camera.
    
    
    comment: Photo of vibracore collected in April 2016 from Fire Island, New York during field activity number 2016-322-FA (https://cmgds.marine.usgs.gov/fan_info.php?fan=2016-322-FA). Published as USGS data release DOI:10.5066/F7FN15GX.
    
    
    EXIF tags: The tag is listed along with the information used to populate it - which is the same for every image.
    
    
    ImageDescription: Photograph of sediment core collected from Fire Island, NY during 2016-322-FA.
    Artist: J. Bernier
    Copyright: Public Domain - please credit U.S. Geological Survey
    
    
    IPTC tags: The tag is listed along with the information used to populate it - which is the same for every image.
    Credit: U.S. Geological Survey
    Contact: gs-g-spcmsc_data_inquiries@usgs.gov
    Keywords: Fire Island National Seashore, New York, Fire Island, 2016-322-FA, Hurricane Sandy, sediment sample, vibracore, USGS
    CopyrightNotice: Public Domain - please credit U.S. Geological Survey
    Caption-Abstract: Photograph of sediment core collected from Fire Island, NY during 2016-322-FA.
    
    
    XMP tags: The tag is listed along with the information used to populate it - which is the same for every image.
    Caption: Photograph of sediment core collected from Fire Island, NY during 2016-322-FA.
    
    
    To extract the information from the image headers using ExifTool, the following command can be used (tested with ExifTool version 10.25):
    
    
    exiftool.exe -csv -f -filename -GPSTimeStamp -GPSLongitude -GPSLatitude -n -Artist -Credit -comment -keywords -Caption -Copyright -CopyrightNotice -Caption-Abstract -ImageDescription photos/*.jpg > out.csv
    
    
    The -csv flag writes the information out in a comma-delimited format. The -n option formats the latitude and longitude as signed decimal degrees. Person who carried out this activity:
    Arnell Forde
    U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Geology Science Center
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    Saint Petersburg, Florida
    U.S.A.

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    aforde@usgs.gov
    Data sources produced in this process:
    • 2016-322-FA_CorePhotos.zip
  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?
    Forde, A.F., Bernier, J.C., and Miselis, J.M., 20180222, Ground penetrating radar and differential global positioning system data collected in April 2016 from Fire Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1078.

    Online Links:

    Blott, S.J. and Pye, K., 2001, Gradistat: A grain size distribution and statistics package for the analysis of unconsolidated sediments: Earth Surface Processes and Landforms Volume 26.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: Pages 1237-1248

How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?
    The positional accuracy of the core locations (https://coastal.er.usgs.gov/data-release/doi-F7FN15GX/data/2016-322-FA_CoreSites.zip) is determined by the accuracy of the raw position data recorded by the Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) antenna during data collection. DGPS coordinates were obtained using post-processing software packages (National Geodetic Survey On-Line Positioning User Service, OPUS, and Waypoint Product Group GrafNav, version 8.50). The grain-size data presented in the summary statistics spreadsheets (https://coastal.er.usgs.gov/data-release/doi-F7FN15GX/data/2016-322-FA_GrainSize_SumStats.zip) represent the sample averages for a subset of the statistical parameters calculated by GRADISTAT. The number of runs included in the averaged results are also reported, and the standard deviation of the averaged results are reported for most parameters. Sample depths were measured to the nearest half-centimeter (cm) using a metric tape measure.
  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?
    Position information (latitude, longitude, and ellipsoid height) associated with each core site was determined by post-processed differential correction. All static GPS base-station sessions were processed through the Online Positioning User Service (OPUS), which is maintained by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Geodetic Survey (NGS). The time-weighted position calculated from all base-station occupations did not differ significantly from the National Park Service (NPS) Robbins Rest (REST) control coordinates; therefore, the control coordinates were used for post-processing. The base-station coordinates were imported into GrafNav, version 8.5 (NovAtel Waypoint Product Group), and the data from the rover GPS (the GPS unit used to collect data at each vibracore site) were post-processed to the concurrent base-station session data. Processing the full-carrier phase data allows precise positioning of the base and rover receivers. Differential processing improves the rover positions by assessing positional errors computed at the base receiver and applying those errors or differences to the rover receiver. Forward and backward time-series processing of the kinematic (rover) data provides an independent calculation of the baseline trajectory and rover position relative to the base station; the positional accuracy can be estimated by differencing the time series (position separation). For this dataset, the estimated post-processed horizontal accuracy (2-sigma) for the core locations was 0.021 +/- 0.008 m.
  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?
    Position information (latitude, longitude, and ellipsoid height) associated with each core site was determined by post-processed differential correction (see full description in the horizontal accuracy report [above]). For this dataset, the estimated post-processed vertical accuracy (2-sigma) for the core locations was 0.029 +/- 0.009 m.
  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?
    Data release doi:10.5066/F7FN15GX associated with this metadata record includes the geographic locations, site elevations, core descriptions, core photos, and grain-size data for 315 samples from 14 vibtracores collected from Fire Island, New York in April 2016 (USGS FAN 2016-322-FA).
  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?
    Position and elevation data at each core site were recorded with an Ashtech DGPS receiver and geodetic antenna. DGPS data were recorded concurrently throughout the survey at a nearby National Park Service benchmark using a similar instrument combination. The final core locations, including elevation, are the post-processed DGPS coordinates; baseline distances for all core sites were 21 kilometers (km) or less. The complete grain-size dataset including all GRADISTAT parameters, results of individual sample runs, and standard deviations for all sample averages are included in the unedited output files (https://coastal.er.usgs.gov/data-release/doi-F7FN15GX/data/2016-322-FA_GrainSize_RunStats.zip). Sample runs in the output files for which the mean Folk and Ward grain size varied from the set average by more than 1.5 standard deviations are highlighted and were not included in final averaged results.

How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?
Access_Constraints: None
Use_Constraints:
The U.S. Geological Survey requests that it be acknowledged as the originator of this dataset in any future products or research derived from these data.
  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)
    U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center
    Attn: Julie C. Bernier
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?
  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?
    This publication was prepared by an agency of the United States Government. Although these data have been processed successfully on a computer system at the U.S. Geological Survey, no warranty expressed or implied is made regarding the display or utility of the data on any other system, or for general or scientific purposes, nor shall the act of distribution imply any such warranty. The U.S. Geological Survey shall not be held liable for improper or incorrect use of the data described and (or) contained herein. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof.
  4. How can I download or order the data?
  5. What hardware or software do I need in order to use the data set?
    The sample locations table was created in Microsoft Excel 2010 and can be opened using Microsoft Excel 2007 or higher. The sample locations are also provided as comma-separated values text files (.csv) and GIS data files in Esri shapefile (.shp) and Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format; the GIS files can be opened using the free ArcGIS Explorer or Google Earth GIS viewers. The core photographs are provided as high-resolution Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) files and can be viewed using standard image viewing software.

Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 02-Jul-2019
Metadata author:
U.S. Geological Survey
Attn: Julie C. Bernier
Geologist
600 4th Street South
St. Petersburg, FL
USA

727-502-8000 (voice)
jbernier@usgs.gov
Metadata standard:
Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)

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