Single-Beam Bathymetry Sounding Data of Cape Canaveral, Florida, (2014) gridded in ESRI ASCII GRID format

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Frequently anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title:
Single-Beam Bathymetry Sounding Data of Cape Canaveral, Florida, (2014) gridded in ESRI ASCII GRID format
Abstract:
The Cape Canaveral Coastal System (CCCS) is a prominent feature along the Southeast U.S. coastline and is the only large cape south of Cape Fear, North Carolina. Most of the CCCS lies within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge and included in its boundaries are the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and a large portion of Canaveral National Seashore. The actual promontory of the modern cape falls within the jurisdictional boundaries of the CCAFS. These various agencies have ongoing concerns related to erosion hazards and vulnerability of the system including critical infrastructure, habitats, and recreational and cultural resources. The USGS conducted a bathymetric mapping survey August 18-20, 2014, in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Cape Canaveral, Florida (USGS Field Activity Number 2014-324-FA). The study area covered an area extending south from Port Canaveral, Florida, to the northern end of the KSC property and from the shoreline to about 2.5 km offshore. Bathymetric data were collected with single-beam sonar- and lidar-based systems. Two jet skis and a 17-ft outboard motor boat equipped with the USGS SANDS hydrographic system collected precision sonar data. The sonar operations were conducted in three missions, one on each day, with the boat and jet skis operating concurrently. The USGS airborne EAARL-B mapping system flown in a twin engine plane was used to collect lidar data. The lidar operations were conducted in three missions, one in the afternoon of August 19, 2015, and two more in the morning and afternoon of August 20, 2014. The missions were synchronized such that there was some temporal and spatial overlap between the sonar and lidar operations. Additional data were collected to evaluate the actual water clarity corresponding to lidar's ability to receive bathymetric returns. This dataset serves as an archive of processed single-beam and lidar bathymetry data collected at Cape Canaveral, Florida, in 2014 (in XYZ comma delimited, ASCII and shapefile format). Also included in this archive are Geographic Information System (GIS) data products: gridded map data (in ESRI binary and ASCII grid format), and a color-coded bathymetry map (in PDF format).
  1. How might this data set be cited?
    Hansen, Mark, 20150920, Single-Beam Bathymetry Sounding Data of Cape Canaveral, Florida, (2014) gridded in ESRI ASCII GRID format: Archive of Bathymetry Data Collected at Cape Canaveral, Florida, 2014 U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 957, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg, Florida.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?
    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -80.623608
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -80.503342
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 28.660641
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 28.402541
  3. What does it look like?
  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?
    Beginning_Date: 18-Aug-2014
    Ending_Date: 20-Aug-2014
    Currentness_Reference:
    ground condition
  5. What is the general form of this data set?
    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: tabular
  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?
    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?
      This is a Raster data set. It contains the following raster data types:
      • Dimensions 519 x 212 x 1, type Grid Cell
    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?
      Grid_Coordinate_System_Name: Universal Transverse Mercator
      Universal_Transverse_Mercator:
      UTM_Zone_Number: 17
      Transverse_Mercator:
      Scale_Factor_at_Central_Meridian: 0.9996
      Longitude_of_Central_Meridian: -81.0
      Latitude_of_Projection_Origin: 0.02
      False_Easting: 500000.001
      False_Northing: 0.0
      Planar coordinates are encoded using row and column
      Abscissae (x-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 55.0127828
      Ordinates (y-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 55.0127828
      Planar coordinates are specified in meters
      The horizontal datum used is North_American_1983.
      The ellipsoid used is GRS1980.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378137.0.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/298.257222101.
      Vertical_Coordinate_System_Definition:
      Depth_System_Definition:
      Depth_Datum_Name: NAVD88
      Depth_Resolution: 0.001
      Depth_Distance_Units: meters
      Depth_Encoding_Method: Explicit depth coordinate included with horizontal coordinates
  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?
    Canaveral_2014-324-FA_sonarASCIIgrd.zip
    Post-processed, area-specific x,y,z attributed gridded single-beam bathymetry data in ASCII text file ESRI’s GRID format. (Source: ESRI)
    Band_1
    Table containing attribute information associated with the dataset (Source: ESRI)
    Range of values
    Minimum:-14.4146767
    Maximum:-0.6922758
    Units:meters
    Resolution:0.001

Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)
    • Mark Hansen
  2. Who also contributed to the data set?
    This project was funded by the U.S. Air Force, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. David M. Thompson (USGS-St. Petersburg) performed a significant portion of bathymetric survey data collection and processing.
  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?
    Mark Hansen
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Oceanographer
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    (727) 502-8000 (voice)
    mhansen@usgs.gov

Why was the data set created?

The work was conducted as part of a study to describe an updated bathymetric dataset collected in 2014 and compare it to previous data sets. The updated data focus on the bathymetric features and sediment transport pathways that connect the offshore regions to the shoreline and, therefore, are related to the protection of other portions of the coastal environment, such as dunes, that support infrastructure and ecosystems. 

How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?
    USGS (source 1 of 1)
    U.S. Geological Survey, 2015, Archive of Bathymetry Data Collected at Cape Canaveral, Florida, 2014.

    Type_of_Source_Media: digital tabular data
    Source_Contribution: Original processed single-beam bathymetric data.
  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?
    Date: 30-Jan-2015 (process 1 of 4)
    Data Acquisition - The sea floor offshore of Cape Canaveral was mapped by using a 17-ft outboard motor boat and two jet skis, equipped with a high-precision Global Positioning Systems (GPS) coupled with a high-precision depth sounder. To accomplish this task, the SANDS (System for Accurate Nearshore Depth Surveying) system was developed by Mark Hansen (SPCMSC) and Jeff List (WHSC) of the U.S. Geological Survey. SANDS consists of two components, hardware and processing techniques. Survey track lines were spaced 500-meters apart and orientated shore normal along the project area. Track lines collected parallel to the coast (intersecting track lines) functioned to serve as a cross-check and to assess the relative vertical accuracy of the survey. Crossing lines are critical because they serve as a check on the internal accuracy of the data. Soundings were collected along each track line at a 0.5 m spacing. In shallow areas, data were collected in a minimum of 0.5 m water depth except where there was potential damage to the bottom environment or the boat/motors. GPS reference stations were NGS/CORS station CCV6 and a temporary benchmark, which was located within about 15 km of the farthest single-beam track line. Reference and rover GPS receivers recorded the 12-channel full-carrier-phase positioning signals (L1/L2) from satellites via Thales choke-ring antennas. The reference and rover receivers record their positions concurrently at 1-second(s) recording intervals throughout the survey. Boat motion was recorded at 50-millisecond (ms) intervals using a TSS Dynamic Motion Sensor 05 (TSS DMS-05©). Bathymetric soundings were recorded at 10-ms intervals using an Odum survey grade echo-sounder. The single-beam data were acquired using the hydrographic software HYPACK© version 10. All data strings from the instruments were streamed in real time and recorded through HYPACK© software. Person who carried out this activity:
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Nathaniel Plant
    Oceanographer
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    (727) 502-8000 (voice)
    nplant@usgs.gov
    Data sources produced in this process:
    • Raw sensor data files in ASCII text format and GPS Carrier-phase data in binary format.
    Date: 30-Jan-2015 (process 2 of 4)
    Differentially Corrected Navigation Processing - The coordinate values of the reference GPS base stations obtained from OPUS were provided in the IGS08 coordinate system. All survey data for the project were referenced to WGS84. Consequently, reference station coordinate were transformed to WGS84 coordinates using the NOAA/NGS software HTDP v3.2.3. The respective reference (base) station coordinates utilized as reference positions were imported into GrafNav© v8.50 software by Novatel. Differentially corrected rover trajectories were computed by merging the master and rover the GPS data. During processing, steps were taken to ensure that the trajectories between the base and rover were clean, resulting in fixed positions. By analyzing the graphs, trajectory maps, and processing logs that GrafNav produces for each GPS session, GPS data from satellites flagged by the program as having poor health or satellite time segments that had cycle slips could be excluded, or the satellite elevation mask angle could be adjusted to improve the position solutions. The final differentially corrected precise DGPS positions were computed for each rover GPS session and exported in ASCII text format. Person who carried out this activity:
    Mark Hansen
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Oceanographer
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    mhansen@usgs.gov
    Data sources produced in this process:
    • Boat trajectory data files in ASCII text format.
    Date: 10-Feb-2015 (process 3 of 4)
    Single-beam Bathymetry Processing - All data were processed using USGS in-house software called Transect Viewer. The primary purpose of Transect Viewer is to time synchronize processed trajectories, soundings, and heave/pitch/roll, and then merge all data strings. Transect Viewer applies latency errors, geometric corrections for antenna staff pitch and roll, geometric corrections for antenna transducer pitch and roll (beam correction), time synchronizes the GPS trajectory and HYPACK© files for each GPS epoch, and applies a geoid separation based upon NOAA/NGS Geoid12a model. Final output is a comma-delimited text file containing: longitude(WGS84-G1150), latitude(WGS84-G1150), ellipsoid_ht(WGS84-G1150), orthometric_ht(G12a). For the orthometric height, elevations are assumed to be relative to NAVD88 via the Geoid12a model. A header line indicates the attributes entry for each column. Person who carried out this activity:
    David Thompson
    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) - St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center
    Oceanographer
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    (727) 502-8000 (voice)
    dthompson@usgs.gov
    Data sources used in this process:
    • The combination of intermediate input files were created and used such as: post-processed differential navigation and unprocessed HYPACK© RAW bathymetric data.
    Data sources produced in this process:
    • Final, processed bathymetry data files in ASCII text format. Canaveral_2014-324-FA_sonarASCIIgrd.zip
    Date: 10-Feb-2015 (process 4 of 4)
    The sounding data were entered into ArcMap© version 10.1 (a gridding and contouring software package) ARCMap© (ESRI) and saved as an ASCII text file in ESRI’s GRID format. Person who carried out this activity:
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Mark Hansen
    Oceanographer
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL
    USA

    (727) 502-8000 (voice)
    mhansen@usgs.gov
  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?
    Thompson, D.M., Plant, N.G., and Hansen, M.E., 20150920, Analysis of Bathymetric Surveys to Identify Coastal Vulnerabilities at Cape Canaveral, Florida, USGS, Open-File Report 2015-1180: U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg, FL.

    Online Links:


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?
    The accuracy of the data is determined during data collection. This dataset is derived from a single research cruise using identical equipment, set-ups, and staff; therefore, the dataset is internally consistent. Methods are employed to maintain data collection consistency aboard the platform. During mobilization, each piece of equipment is isolated to obtain internal and external offset measurements with respect to the survey platform. All the critical measurements are recorded manually and digitally entered into their respective programs. For the single-beam bathymetry, offsets between the single-beam transducers and the Ashtech antenna reference point (ARP) were measured and accounted for in post-processing. Bar checks were performed as calibration efforts and accounted for any drift in the Odum Echosounder. Differential Geographic Positioning System (DGPS) coordinates were obtained using post-processing software packages created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/National Geodetic Survey (NGS) Online Positioning User Service (OPUS). Boat trajectories were computed with GrafNav© v8.50 software by Novatel, Inc. These bathymetric data have not been independently verified for accuracy. Although these data have been processed successfully on a computer system at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), no warranty expressed or implied is made regarding the display or utility of the data on any other system or for general or scientific purposes, nor shall the act of distribution constitute any such warranty. The USGS or the U.S. Government shall not be held liable for improper or incorrect use of the data described and/or contained herein.
  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?
    The GPS antenna and receiver acquisition configuration used at the reference station was duplicated on the survey vessel (rover). The base receiver and the rover receiver record their positions concurrently at 10Hz recording intervals throughout the survey. All processed measurements are referenced to the base station coordinates. NOAA/NGS CORS stations CCV6 and a new ground-control point or benchmark within the study area were used as reference receiver sites. For this survey, one new benchmark was built using standard benchmarks procedures. GPS base stations were operated within approximately 15 to 20 km of the survey area. New benchmarks positions were surveyed using Ashtech Z-Extreme, 12 channel dual-frequency GPS receivers. Full-phase carrier data were recorded on each occupied benchmark in Ashtech proprietary BIN format with daily occupations ranging from 6 to 12 hours. BIN files were then converted to RINEX-2 format for position processing. For newly established benchmarks, all static base station GPS sessions were submitted for processing to the NOAA/NGS OPUS software. The base location results from OPUS were entered into a spreadsheet to compute one final positional coordinate and error analysis for that base location. The final positional coordinate (latitude, longitude, and ellipsoid height) is the weighted average of all GPS sessions. For each GPS session, the weighted average was calculated using the OPUS result and the total session time in seconds; therefore, longer GPS occupation times held more value than shorter occupation times. OPUS results are computed relative to IGS08 coordinate system. The established geodetic reference frame for the project was WGS84. Therefore, final reference coordinates used to process the rover data were transformed from IGS08 to WGS84 using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Geodetic Survey (NOAA/NGS) Horizontal Time-Dependent Positioning HTDP software v3.2.3. OPUS results provide an error measurement for each daily solution. Applying these error measurements, the horizontal accuracy of the base station is estimated to be 0.02 m root mean squared (RMS). The kinematic (rover) trajectories were processed using GrafNav© v8.50 software by Novatel, Inc. A horizontal error measurement, RMS is computed for each epoch. The horizontal trajectory errors varied between 0 and 0.06 m. During acquisition, boat motion was measured using a TSS DMS-05© heave, roll, and pitch sensor, which can measure within 0.05 degrees. The TSS data string was captured and recorded in the HYPACK© RAW bathymetry data files. Using USGS Transect Viewer software, the differentially corrected navigation files exported from GrafNav were parsed together by time with the HYPACK© RAW files and then merged together, at which time the TSS measurements were used to geometrically correct the soundings at each differentially corrected position. The uncertainties of the roll and pitch corrections applied to the horizontal position are unknown. The combined horizontal error from base station coordinate solutions and rover trajectories ranged from 0.02 and 0.08 m, with an average of approximately 0.04 m.
  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?
    The GPS antenna and receiver acquisition configuration used at the reference station was duplicated on the survey vessel (rover). The base receiver and the rover receiver record their positions concurrently at 10Hz recording intervals throughout the survey. All processed measurements are referenced to the base station coordinates. NOAA/NGS CORS stations CCV6 and a new ground-control point or benchmark within the study area were used as reference receiver sites. For this survey, one new benchmark was built using standard benchmarks procedures. GPS base stations were operated within approximately 15 to 20 km of the survey area. New benchmarks positions were surveyed using Ashtech Z-Extreme©, 12 channel dual-frequency GPS receivers. Full-phase carrier data were recorded on each occupied benchmark in Ashtech proprietary BIN format with daily occupations ranging from 6 to 12 hours. BIN files were then converted to RINEX-2 format for position processing. For newly established benchmarks, all static base station GPS sessions were submitted for processing to the NOAA/NGS OPUS software. The base location results from OPUS were entered into a spreadsheet to compute one final positional coordinate and error analysis for that base location. The final positional coordinate (latitude, longitude, and ellipsoid height) is the weighted average of all GPS sessions. For each GPS session, the weighted average was calculated using the OPUS result and the total session time in seconds; therefore, longer GPS occupation times held more value than shorter occupation times. OPUS results are computed relative to IGS08 coordinate system. The established geodetic reference frame for the project was WGS84. Therefore, final reference coordinates used to process the rover data were transformed from IGS08 to WGS84 using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Geodetic Survey (NOAA/NGS) Horizontal Time-Dependent Positioning HTDP software v3.2.3. OPUS results provide an error measurement for each daily solution. Applying these error measurements, the vertical accuracy of the base station is estimated to be 0.02 m root mean squared (RMS). The kinematic (rover) trajectories were processed using GrafNav© v8.50 software by Novatel, Inc. A vertical error measurement, RMS is computed for each epoch. The horizontal trajectory errors varied between 0 and 0.14 m. During acquisition, boat motion was measured using a TSS DMS-05© heave, roll, and pitch sensor, which can measure within 0.05 degrees. The TSS data string was captured and recorded in the HYPACK RAW bathymetry data files. Using USGS Transect Viewer software, the differentially-corrected navigation files exported from GrafNav were parsed together by time with the HYPACK RAW files and then merged together, at which time the TSS measurements were used to geometrically correct the soundings at each differentially-corrected position. The uncertainties of the roll and pitch corrections applied to the vertical position are unknown. The combined vertical error from base station coordinate solutions and rover trajectories ranged from 0 and 0.14 m, with an average of approximately 0.07 m.
  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?
    This is a complete raster grid derived from post-processed x,y,z bathymetric data points acquired with an acoustic single-beam system collected in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Cape Canaveral, FL.
  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?
    This dataset was acquired on a single research cruise in 2014.

How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?
Access_Constraints:
The U.S. Geological Survey requests that it be referenced as the originator of this dataset in any future products or research derived from these data.
Use_Constraints: These data should not be used for navigational purposes.
  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)
    Mark E. Hansen
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Oceanographer
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL

    (727) 502-8000 (voice)
    mhansen@usgs.gov
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set? 2014 bathymetric data
  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?
    The data have no explicit or implied guarantees. Any use of trade, firm, or product names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Although these data have been processed successfully on a computer system at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), no warranty expressed or implied is made regarding the display or utility of the data on any other system or for general or scientific purposes, nor shall the act of distribution constitute any such warranty. The USGS or the U.S. Government shall not be held liable for improper or incorrect use of the data described and/or contained herein.
  4. How can I download or order the data?

Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 16-Sep-2015
Metadata author:
U.S. Geological Survey
Attn: Mark Hansen
Oceanographer
600 4th Street South
St. Petersburg, FL
USA

(727) 502-8000 (voice)
mhansen@usgs.gov
Metadata standard:
FGDC Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)

This page is <https://cmgds.marine.usgs.gov/catalog/spcmsc/Canaveral_2014-324-FA_GRID-TXT_WGS84_NAVD88_G12a_metadata.faq.html>
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