Archive of Ground Penetrating Radar and Differential Global Positioning System Data Collected in April 2016 from Fire Island, New York

Metadata also available as - [Outline] - [Parseable text] - [XML]

Frequently anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title:
Archive of Ground Penetrating Radar and Differential Global Positioning System Data Collected in April 2016 from Fire Island, New York
Abstract:
Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a long-term, coastal morphologic-change study at Fire Island, New York, prior to and after Hurricane Sandy impacted the area in October 2012. The Fire Island Coastal Change project (https://coastal.er.usgs.gov/fire-island/) objectives include understanding the morphologic evolution of the barrier island system on a variety of time scales (months to centuries) and resolving storm-related impacts, post-storm beach response, and recovery. In April 2016, scientists from the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted geophysical and sediment sampling surveys on Fire Island to characterize and quantify spatial variability in the subaerial geology with the goal of subsequently integrating onshore geology with other surf zone and nearshore datasets.
Supplemental_Information:
Data were collected during USGS Field Activity Number 2016-322-FA. Additional survey and data details are available from the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geoscience Data System (CMGDS) at, https://cmgds.marine.usgs.gov/2016-322-FA.
  1. How might this data set be cited?
    Forde, Arnell S., Bernier, Julie C., and Miselis, Jennifer L., 20180221, Archive of Ground Penetrating Radar and Differential Global Positioning System Data Collected in April 2016 from Fire Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Data Release doi:10.5066/F7P84B1P, U.S. Geological Survey - St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, Florida.

    Online Links:

    This is part of the following larger work.

    Forde, Arnell S., Bernier, Julie C., and Miselis, Jennifer L., 20180221, Ground Penetrating Radar and Differential Global Positioning System Data Collected in April 2016 from Fire Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1078, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg, FL.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?
    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -73.184494
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -72.925553
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 40.719032
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 40.633955
  3. What does it look like?
  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?
    Beginning_Date: 06-Apr-2016
    Ending_Date: 13-Apr-2016
    Currentness_Reference:
    ground condition
  5. What is the general form of this data set?
    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: multimedia presentation
  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?
    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?
      This is a Vector data set. It contains the following vector data types (SDTS terminology):
      • String (73)
    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?
      Horizontal positions are specified in geographic coordinates, that is, latitude and longitude. Latitudes are given to the nearest 0.0197877137. Longitudes are given to the nearest 0.0227813369. Latitude and longitude values are specified in Decimal degrees. The horizontal datum used is North American Datum 1983.
      The ellipsoid used is Geodectic Reference System 80.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378137.0.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/298.257222101.
      Vertical_Coordinate_System_Definition:
      Altitude_System_Definition:
      Altitude_Datum_Name: North American Vertical Datum 1988
      Altitude_Resolution: 0.001 m
      Altitude_Distance_Units: meter
      Altitude_Encoding_Method: Attribute values
  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?
    2016-322-FA_gpr_traces.zip
    File containing the raw, unprocessed GPR profile exported in ASCII 4-column format. Many XYZ processing programs do not accept column header labels; therefore, they were not included in this file. The column headers are as follows: Column 1 = Horizontal distance (meters), Column 2 = Elevation (meters), Column 3 = Two-way travel time (nanoseconds), Column 4 = Amplitude (Megahertz). (Source: USGS)
    Horizontal distance
    This column indicates the location, in meters, from the start (0) to the end of the GPR profile and can be used to locate the position of reflections. The linear distance data were collected using a 16-inch survey wheel. (Source: Reflexw) Values start with 0 (the beginning of the profile) and end with the total distance (m) covered by the profile.
    Elevation
    Elevation data were not recorded directly to the GPR trace headers but were saved separately with the navigation GGA string. (Source: Reflexw) Values in this column are all zero, since elevation data were not integrated into the raw data.
    Two-way travel time
    This column records the two-way travel time, in nanoseconds, that it takes to reach a reflection surface from the source. (Source: Reflexw)
    Range of values
    Minimum:0
    Maximum:200
    Amplitude
    Amplitude of reflection, in Megahertz (Source: Reflexw) Data represents the amplitude of the reflection, which can vary widely, values can be either negative or positive.
    2016-322-FA_dgps.zip
    File containing the processed navigation data for the GPR profiles, which were output as GGA strings for each profile. Data are comma-separated text files and do not contain column headers; column definitions are provided in the following attributes: (Source: GrafNav)
    $GPGGA
    Message ID; essential fix data that provides 3D location and accuracy. (Source: GrafNav) Attribute is a file format identification.
    UTC of position fix
    Time stamp of position fix (Coordinated Universal Time) in hhmmss.00 format, where hh = hour (in 24-hour format), mm = minutes, and ss = seconds. (Source: GrafNav) Value is the UTC time stamp and increases by 1 every second.
    Latitude
    The latitude of the XYZ point (NAD83) in DDMM.MMMMM format. (Source: GrafNav) Values are degrees of latitude, spatial data.
    Direction of latitude
    Direction of latitude is in the Northern (N) Hemisphere. (Source: GravNav) The attribute indicates that the degree of latitude is in the Northern Hemisphere.
    Longitude
    The longitude of the XYZ data point (NAD83) in DDMM.MMMMM format. (Source: GrafNav) Values are degrees of longitude, spatial data.
    Direction of longitude
    Direction of longitude is in the Western (W) Hemisphere. (Source: GrafNav) The attribute indicates that the degree of longitude is in the Western Hemisphere.
    GPS Quality indicator 0: Fix not valid 1: GPS fix 2: Differential GPS fix, OmniSTAR VBS 4: Real-Time Kinematic, fixed integers 5: Real-Time Kinematic, float integers, OmniSTAR XP/HP or Location RTK
    Defines the type and quality of the DGPS data. Occasionally, GPS quality indicator values were not recorded by the acquisition system to the raw GGA string; consequently, these fields are displayed as blank/empty attributes in the final navigation files. (Source: GrafNav)
    Range of values
    Minimum:0
    Maximum:5
    Number of satellites in view
    Number of satellites utilized by the program to process the data. Occasionally, values were not recorded by the acquisition system to the raw GGA string; consequently, these fields are displayed as blank/empty attributes in the final navigation files. (Source: GrafNav)
    Range of values
    Minimum:00
    Maximum:24
    HDOP
    Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) expresses the effect of satellite positions on the precision of the reported positions. < 1 Ideal, 1-2 Excellent, 2-5 good, 5-10 moderate, 10-20 fair, > 20 poor. (Source: GrafNav)
    Range of values
    Minimum:0
    Maximum:20
    Orthometric height (MSL reference)
    Height of the XYZ position in reference to NAVD88, using GEIOD12A. (Source: GrafNav) Elevation above GEIOD12A, in meters.
    M
    Unit of measure used for the orthometric height. (Source: GrafNav) The orthometric height is reported in meters.
    Geoid separation
    Height of GEIOD (mean sea level) above the ellipsoid. (Source: GrafNav) Separation between GEIOD12A and the reference NAD83 ellipsoid, in meters.
    M
    Unit of measure used for the GEIOD separation. (Source: GrafNav) The GEIOD separation is reported in meters.
    Age of differential GPS data record
    Time in seconds since last DGPS update. (Source: GrafNav) This field is required by the GGA string; however, only null values were recorded by the acquisition system for every line collected during the survey. This attribute is displayed as blank/empty in the final navigation files.
    Reference station ID
    Refers to the reference station used to process the DGPS data presented in this dataset. (Source: GrafNav) Values vary depending upon station used, a null value is utilized when any reference station ID is selected and no corrections are received.
    Checksum data
    The value of the checksum data used to detect errors; this field always begins with *. (Source: GrafNav) The checksum is the hexadecimal representation of two hexadecimal characters of an XOR of all the bytes between [$] and [*], not including the delimiters.
    2016-322-FA_profile_images.zip
    File contains the JPEG images of the processed GPR profiles with the elevation and radar-wave velocity corrections applied. (Source: USGS)
    2016-322-FA_tracklines.zip
    Geospatial data representation showing the locations of all the GPR tracklines collected during 2016-322-FA. GIS files are provided in Esri shapefile (.shp) and Keyhole Markup Language (KML) formats. (Source: USGS)
    2016-322-FA_profile_parameters.zip
    Table listing profile-specific data acquisition and processing parameters for each GPR profile. These attributes also apply to the trackline file described above. (Source: USGS)
    LineID
    GPR trackline number (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:001
    Maximum:327
    DateColl
    Date the GPR trackline data were collected. (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:06-Apr-2016
    Maximum:13-Apr-2016
    DOY
    Day of year, as represented on the Julian calendar, the data were collected. (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:97
    Maximum:104
    Range_ns
    Range is the maximum two-way travel time in nanoseconds that is viewed during data collection. Lines 266-273 and 310-327 were collected with a range of 100; all other lines were collected with a range of 200. (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:100
    Maximum:200
    TowedBy
    Describes whether the GPR antenna was pulled on foot or towed behind a vehicle. (Source: USGS)
    ValueDefinition
    on footGSSI was pulled over terrain, on foot, by USGS staff.
    vehicleGSSI was towed behind a survey vehicle, at approximately 4-5 miles per hour.
    Site
    Identifies the study site at which the GPR profile was collected. Data were collected from three study sites that were considered representative of the western (Site 1), central (Site 2), and eastern (Site 3) Fire Island geomorphic zones. (Source: USGS)
    ValueDefinition
    Site 1Western Fire Island, NPS and private land
    Site2Central Fire Island, NPS and private land
    Site 3Eastern Fire Island, wilderness area
    Location
    Describes the geomorphic setting from which the GPR profile was collected. Data were collected from beach as well as developed and undeveloped back-barrier environments. (Source: USGS)
    ValueDefinition
    BeachBeach environment
    Back-barrierBack-barrier environment
    Beach accessBeach access road
    Washover fanWashover fan/hiking trails found in back-barrier scrub/shrub vegetation
    Location2
    Identifies the local community or publicly-owned land parcel from which the GPR profile was collected. Data were collected within residential, national park, and wilderness areas on Fire Island. (Source: USGS)
    ValueDefinition
    Point O' WoodsPoint O' Woods, NY
    Ocean Bay ParkOcean Bay Park, NY
    Ocean BeachOcean Beach, NY
    DunewoodDunewood, NY
    AtlantiqueAtlantique, NY
    Fire Island National SeashoreFire Island National Seashore, NY
    Robbin's RestRobbin's Rest, NY
    Blue Point BeachBlue Point Beach, NY
    Davis ParkDavis Park, NY
    Watch HillDavis Park, NY
    Otis Pike Fire Island High Dune WildernessOtis Pike Fire Island High Dune Wilderness, NY
    Description
    Physical description, including orientation and terrain, of the environment from which the GPR profile was collected. (Source: USGS) Data were collected within residential, national park, and wilderness areas on Fire Island.
    SurfaceType
    Qualitative description of the predominant surface material along the GPR profile. Data were collected across a variety of surfaces, including concrete, brick, or sandy roads; beach; and back-barrier washover fans and hiking trails. (Source: USGS)
    ValueDefinition
    Sand (beach)Sand, beach area
    Road (mixed)Road, concrete or mixed material
    Road (brick)Road, brick
    Road (sandy shoulder)Road, sandy shoulder
    BoardwalkBoardwalk, wooden
    Road (sand)Road, sand
    SandSand, washover fans
    Sand (hiking trail)Sand, hiking trail
    Length_m
    Measured length of the GPR profile, in meters. (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:31.57
    Maximum:1069.82
    MinElev_m
    Minimum elevation along the GPR profile, in meters relative to NAVD88 (GEOID12A). (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:0.36
    Maximum:3.048
    MaxElev_m
    Maximum elevation along the GPR profile, in meters relative to NAVD88 (GEOID12A). (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:0.959
    Maximum:6.75
    Velocity_m/ns
    Radar-wave velocity through the sediment, in meters per nanosecond, estimated from hyperbola analysis along selected profiles. (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:0.06
    Maximum:0.2
    Dielectric
    The dielectric constant of the sediment, calculated from the radar-wave velocity. This is a dimensionless value. (Source: USGS)
    Range of values
    Minimum:2.247001
    Maximum:24.9666777778
    Vel2_m/ns
    Radar-wave velocity through the sediment, in meters per nanosecond, estimated from hyperbola analysis along a selected profile. (Source: USGS)
    ValueDefinition
    0.08Average radar wave velocity, in meters per nanosecond.
    Dial2
    The dielectric constant of the sediment, calculated from the radar-wave velocity. This is a dimensionless value. (Source: USGS)
    ValueDefinition
    14.04375625Average dielectric constant
    2016-322-FA_FACS.zip
    Portable Document Format (PDF) files of the field logs, survey overview, list of crew and equipment used during field activity 2016-322-FA. (Source: USGS)
    Entity_and_Attribute_Overview:
    The entity and attribute information provided here describes the tabular data associated with the dataset. Please review the detailed descriptions that are provided (the individual attribute descriptions) for information on the values that appear as fields/table entries of the dataset.
    Entity_and_Attribute_Detail_Citation:
    The entity and attribute information was generated by the individual and/or agency identified as the originator of the dataset. Please review the rest of the metadata record for additional details and information.

Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)
    • Arnell S. Forde
    • Julie C. Bernier
    • Jennifer L. Miselis
  2. Who also contributed to the data set?
  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?
    U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center
    Attn: Arnell S. Forde
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL

    727-502-8000 (voice)
    727-502-8001 (FAX)
    aforde@usgs.gov

Why was the data set created?

This data release, along with the accompanying USGS Data Series (Forde and others, 2018), serves as an archive of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and post-processed differential global positioning system (DGPS) data collected from beach and back-barrier environments on Fire Island, April 6–13, 2016 (USGS Field Activity Number 2016-322-FA). These data can be used to map shallow subsurface sediments such as erosional surfaces or washover deposits and can also image deeper stratigraphic features that may aid in linking terrestrial geology to nearshore and offshore geologic features. Beach profiles (Henderson and others, 2017) and sedimentologic (push- and vibracore) data were also collected during the same survey as part of ongoing research investigating post-Hurricane Sandy beach response and recovery. For additional information regarding data acquisition and processing methods, refer to Forde and others, 2018.

How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?
  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?
    Date: 2016 (process 1 of 4)
    Navigation data acquisition-Position and elevation data for each GPR line were recorded at the time of collection using an Ashtech DGPS receiver and geodetic antenna. DGPS data were recorded concurrently throughout the survey using a similar instrument combination (Ashtech receiver and Thales choke ring antenna) at a base station set up on the National Park Service (NPS) Robins Rest benchmark (REST). The rover unit was mounted 1.302 m above the GPR antenna and was connected to the GPR's digital control unit. Raw GPS positions were output to the GPR control unit in real time as a National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA) GGA string at 1-second (s) intervals using coordinated universal time (UTC) stamps and saved as a .plt data file. Person who carried out this activity:
    Julie C. Bernier
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL

    (727) 502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov
    Date: 2016 (process 2 of 4)
    GPR data acquisition-A total of 90 GPR lines, representing a linear distance of approximately 21 kilometers (km), were acquired during field activity 2016-322-FA from beach as well as developed and undeveloped back-barrier environments. Data were collected from three study sites that were considered representative of the western (Site 1), central (Site 2), and eastern (Site 3) Fire Island geomorphic zones. At sites 1 and 2, back-barrier data were collected along beach access roads and established roads within and connecting local communities. At site 3, which is located entirely within the Otis Pike Wilderness Area, data were collected along washover fans and along hiking trails through back-barrier scrub/shrub vegetation. The GPR data were collected with a Geophysical Survey Systems, Inc. (GSSI) TerraSIRch SIR System-3000, which acquires single-channel GPR data and includes a Digital Control Unit (model DC-3000) and 200 Megahertz (MHz) antenna. A 16-inch survey wheel (GSSI model 620) was attached to the back of the antenna and calibrated prior to surveying to ensure an accurate revolution-of-wheel to distance ratio. Distance mode was used to record the raw GPR data and the raw GGA position string was recorded in real time via an Acumen SDR data logger. GPR traces were collected at a maximum rate of 64 scans per second with a vertical resolution of 1,024 samples per scan and an Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) filter was used (Lowpass = 600 MHz, Highpass = 50 MHz) to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the recorded GPR data. Data were acquired using RADAN 7 proprietary software in TerraSIRch mode and saved in Data Zero Time (DZT) format. Acquisition settings were adjusted when necessitated by changes to the subsurface geology or surrounding topography/surface conditions and were recorded in the Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs. Person who carried out this activity:
    Julie C. Bernier
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL

    (727) 502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov
    Date: 2016 (process 3 of 4)
    Navigation processing-Base station data were post-processed through the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) On-Line Positioning User Service (OPUS). The time-weighted position calculated from all base-station occupations did not differ significantly from the NPS control coordinates; therefore, the control coordinates were used for post-processing. The base station coordinates were imported into GrafNav, versions 8.5 and 8.7 (NovAtel Waypoint Product Group), and the data from the rover GPS were post-processed to the concurrent base-station session data. The final, differentially corrected, DGPS positions were computed at 1-s intervals for each rover GPS session and exported in American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) text format as a NMEA GGA string, which replaced the uncorrected real-time rover positions recorded during acquisition. The GPS data were acquired and processed in the World Geodetic System of 1984 (WGS84) (G1150) geodetic datum. Along some GPR profiles that were collected within communities with closely spaced buildings or in coastal forests, the satellite signals were obscured, and post-processed GPS positions could not be computed for every epoch. Gaps greater than about 15 m in length were filled by interpolating elevations from NOAA lidar data collected in 2014. The final navigation files provided in Forde and others (2018) were exported to the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83) (2011) and North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88), derived using the GEIOD12A geodetic model. Trackline files were created from the post-processed GPS data using the Points to Line tool in Esri ArcGIS version 10.3.1. Person who carried out this activity:
    Julie C. Bernier
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL

    (727) 502-8000 (voice)
    jbernier@usgs.gov
    Date: 2017 (process 4 of 4)
    GPR processing-Reflexw Version 7.2.2 (Sandmeier Scientific Software) geophysical near-surface processing and interpretation software was used to process the GPR data. GPR data were acquired in Radan’s DZT format and later imported into Reflexw, where they were converted into a DAT file. For archival purposes, a non-proprietary version of the raw data was created by exporting the DAT file from Reflexw and saving it in ASCII 4-column format. The data were processed in a consistent order: (1) static correction was applied; (2) the mean value was subtracted (dewowed); (3) header gain applied during acquisition was removed; (4) manual Automatic Gain Control (AGC) gain was applied; and (5) post-processed DGPS data were imported into the trace headers. Data were visually inspected after each step listed above and before elevation-corrected profiles were exported; all profiles were analyzed for errors or data gaps in the navigation and trace data to ensure data quality was maintained throughout. Hyperbola analyses were performed on selected profiles to estimate the radar-wave velocities through the sediment. Calculated velocities (N=30) ranged from 0.06 to 0.2 meters per nanosecond (m/ns) and averaged 0.094 m/ns. The processed profile data were re-imported into RADAN 7 and the surface normalization processing algorithm was applied, adjusting the profile to both the measured terrain and the site-specific, averaged radar-wave velocity. Finally, elevation- and velocity-corrected profiles were exported as Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) images. Person who carried out this activity:
    Arnell S. Forde
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St.Petersburg, FL

    (727)502-8000 (voice)
    aforde@usgs.gov
  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?
    Zaremba, Nicholas J., Bernier, Julie C., Forde, Arnell S., and Smith, Christopher G., 20160608, Raw and processed Ground Penetrating Radar and post-processed Differential Global Positioning System data collected from Assateague Island, Maryland, October 2014: U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 989, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg, FL.

    Online Links:


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?
    Visual inspection of the GPR profile images rendered from the data did not show any major anomalies. Latitude, longitude and elevation values included in the final navigation files were manually checked and verified by the processor. Doing so confirms that USGS data Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA/QC) procedures have been followed, thus ensuring the final DGPS data quality expectations are achieved.
  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?
    Location information associated with each GPR line was determined by post-processed differential correction using a base/rover setup. Processing the full-carrier phase data allows precise positioning of the base and rover receivers. Differential processing improves the rover positions by assessing positional errors computed at the base receiver and applying those errors or differences to the rover receiver. Forward and backward time-series processing of the kinematic (rover) data provides an independent calculation of the baseline trajectory and rover position relative to the base station; the positional accuracy can be estimated by differencing the time series (position separation). For this dataset, the estimated post-processed horizontal accuracies (2-sigma) for study sites 1, 2, and 3 were 0.021 +/- 0.032 m, 0.023 +/- 0.012 m, and 0.022 +/- 0.006 m, respectively.
  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?
    Location information associated with each GPR line was determined by post-processed differential correction using a base/rover setup (see full description in the horizontal accuracy report above). For this dataset, the estimated post-processed vertical accuracies (1-sigma) for study sites 1, 2, and 3 were 0.038 +/- 0.070 m, 0.039 +/- 0.036 m, and 0.032 +/- 0.012 m, respectively. Along some GPR profiles that were collected within communities with closely spaced buildings or in coastal forests, the satellite signals were obscured, and post-processed GPS positions could not be computed for every epoch. Gaps greater than about 15 m in length were filled by interpolating elevations from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) data collected in 2014. The reported vertical accuracy (RMSEz) for the lidar dataset is 0.254 m at the 95% confidence level.
  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?
    A total of 90 GPR lines, representing a linear distance of approximately 21 kilometers, were acquired during field activity 2016-322-FA. During the survey, several additional lines were collected to test various acquisition settings on the GPR control unit or conduct velocity calibrations; these lines were typically duplicates of previously collected lines that were known to contain valid data. Where applicable, these test lines were marked as "DO NOT USE" in the field logbook (2016-322-FA_FACS_GPRoperations.pdf) and the data were not processed; consequently, those lines were excluded from this data release. The omitted lines are: 004, 263, 264, 265, 267, 268, 269, 270, 280, 286, 287, 289, 298, 319, 321, and 322.
  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?
    This dataset is from one field activity with consistent instrument calibrations.

How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?
Access_Constraints: None.
Use_Constraints:
Public domain data from the U.S. Government are freely redistributable with proper metadata and source attribution. The U.S. Geological Survey requests to be acknowledged as originators of the data in future products or derivative research. Users are advised to read the metadata record thoroughly to understand appropriate use and data limitations.
  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)
    Arnell S. Forde
    U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center
    Geologist
    600 4th Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL

    (727)-502-8000 (voice)
    aforde@usgs.gov
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?
  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?
    This publication was prepared by an agency of the United States Government. Although these data were processed successfully on a computer system at the U.S. Geological Survey, no warranty expressed or implied is made regarding the display or utility of the data on any other system, nor shall the act of distribution imply any such warranty. The U.S. Geological Survey shall not be held liable for improper or incorrect use of the data described and (or) contained herein. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof.
  4. How can I download or order the data?
  5. What hardware or software do I need in order to use the data set?
    The profile parameters files were created in Microsoft Excel 2010 and can be opened using Microsoft Excel 2007 or higher; these data may also be viewed using the free Microsoft Excel Viewer (http://office.microsoft.com/). The GPR profile trackline locations are provided as GIS data files in Esri shapefile (.shp) and Keyhole Markup Language (KML) formats; these files can be opened using the free ArcGIS Explorer (http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/explorer) or Google Earth (https://www.google.com/earth/) GIS viewers.

Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 21-Aug-2019
Metadata author:
Arnell S. Forde
U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center
Geologist
600 4th Street South
St. Petersburg, FL

(727)-502-8000 (voice)
aforde@usgs.gov
Metadata standard:
Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)

This page is <https://cmgds.marine.usgs.gov/catalog/spcmsc/2016-322-FA_metadata.faq.html>
Generated by mp version 2.9.49 on Mon Sep 10 17:44:16 2018