Polygon shapefile of the interpretation of the seabed geologic substrates in quadrangle 6 of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region offshore of Boston, Massachusetts based on data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1993-2004 (Geographic, NAD 83)

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Frequently anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title:
Polygon shapefile of the interpretation of the seabed geologic substrates in quadrangle 6 of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region offshore of Boston, Massachusetts based on data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1993-2004 (Geographic, NAD 83)
Abstract:
The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Marine Sanctuary Program, has conducted seabed mapping and related research in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region since 1993. The area is approximately 3,700 square kilometers (km2) and is subdivided into 18 quadrangles. Seven maps, at a scale of 1:25,000, of quadrangle 6 (211 km2) depict seabed topography, backscatter, ruggedness, geology, substrate mobility, mud content, and areas dominated by fine-grained or coarse-grained sand. Interpretations of bathymetric and seabed backscatter imagery, photographs, video, and grain-size analyses were used to create the geology-based maps. In all, data from 420 stations were analyzed, including sediment samples from 325 locations. The seabed geology map shows the distribution of 10 substrate types ranging from boulder ridges to immobile, muddy sand to mobile, rippled sand. Substrate types are defined on the basis of sediment grain-size composition, surficial morphology, sediment layering, and the mobility or immobility of substrate surfaces. This map series is intended to portray the major geological elements (substrates, features, processes) of environments within quadrangle 6. Additionally, these maps will be the basis for the study of the ecological requirements of invertebrate and vertebrate species that utilize these substrates and guide seabed management in the region.
  1. How might this data set be cited?
    Valentine, Page C., 2015, Polygon shapefile of the interpretation of the seabed geologic substrates in quadrangle 6 of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region offshore of Boston, Massachusetts based on data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1993-2004 (Geographic, NAD 83): Scientific Investigations Map 3341, U.S. Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Geology Program, Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center, Woods Hole, MA.

    Online Links:

    This is part of the following larger work.

    Valentine, Page C., and Gallea, Leslie B., 2015, Seabed maps showing topography, ruggedness, backscatter intensity, sediment mobility, and the distribution of geologic substrates in quadrangle 6 of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region offshore of Boston, Massachusetts: Scientific Investigations Map 3341, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?
    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -70.222221
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -70.033333
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 42.322224
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 42.202778
  3. What does it look like?
    http://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3341/data/SIM3341_geol_interp.jpg (JPEG)
    Thumbnail image showing the interpreted bottom features within quadrangle 6 of the SBNMS region.
  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?
    Beginning_Date: 1993
    Ending_Date: 2004
    Currentness_Reference:
    ground condition of original data upon which the interpretation is based.
  5. What is the general form of this data set?
    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: vector digital data
  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?
    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?
      This is a Vector data set. It contains the following vector data types (SDTS terminology):
      • G-polygon (187)
    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?
      Horizontal positions are specified in geographic coordinates, that is, latitude and longitude. Latitudes are given to the nearest 0.000001. Longitudes are given to the nearest 0.000001. Latitude and longitude values are specified in Decimal degrees. The horizontal datum used is North American Datum of 1983.
      The ellipsoid used is Geodetic Reference System 80.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378137.000000.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/298.257222.
  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?
    SIM3341_geologic_interp
    Interpreted substrate polygons of quadrangle 6 located in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region. (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
    FID
    Internal feature number (Source: Esri) Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.
    Shape
    Feature geometry. (Source: Esri) Coordinates defining the features.
    Sub_Unit_S
    Substrate Unit Symbol abbreviation corresponding to the geologic substrate ("geo_substr") name. (Source: U.S. Geolgocial Survey)
    ValueDefinition
    A1Abbreviated symbol for A1 r_cgS
    A2Abbreviated symbol for A2 i_cgS
    BAbbreviated symbol for B r_cgS / i_cbG
    CAbbreviated symbol for C i_cbG
    D1Abbreviated symbol for D1 i_cgS / pbcG
    D2Abbreviated symbol for D2 i_mcgS / pcbG
    EAbbreviated symbol for E i_cgS
    FAbbreviated symbol for F i_cgS / pbcG
    G1Abbreviated symbol for G1 i_mfgS
    G2Abbreviated symbol for G2 i_mfgS
    geo_substr
    Geologic substrate unit name that designates a unique substrate area on the seabed of quadrangle 6. (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
    ValueDefinition
    A1 r_cgSRippled, coarse-grained sand. Substrate A1 is a mobile sand deposit on the upper flank of Stellwagen Bank. Depth range is 30 to 56 m. Mean weight percents per grain-size category: mud <1; sand 90 (fgS, 3; cgS, 88); gravel 9 (G1, 8; G2, 1). Substrate A1 is equivalent to the mobile portion of adjacent substrate B; and it is similar to adjacent immobile substrate A2 which lies at deeper depths (53 to 77 m) on the lower flank of Stellwagen Bank and contains more fine-grained sand (11 weight percent).
    A2 i_cgSImmobile, coarse-grained sand. Substrate A2 is an immobile sand deposit on the lower flank of Stellwagen Bank. Depth range is 53 to 77 m. Mean weight percents per grain-size category: mud 1; sand 83 (fgS, 11; cgS, 72); gravel, 16 (G1, 11; G2, 5). Substrate A2 is similar to adjacent mobile substrate A1 which lies at shallower depths (30 to 56 m) and contains less fine-grained sand (3 weight percent). It contains less mud and fine-grained sand than substrate E.
    B r_cgS / i_cbGRippled, coarse-grained sand; partial veneer on immobile, cobble, boulder gravel. Substrate B is a layered substrate of mobile sand overlying immobile gravel on the shallow flank of Stellwagen Bank. Depth range is 36 to 58 m. Mean weight percents per grain-size category: mud, <1; sand, 92 (fgS, 5; cgS, 86); gravel, 8 (G1, 7; G2, 1). Cobbles and boulders are identified on the basis of video and photographic imagery. Boulder ridges (substrate C) are present. The mobile sand layer of substrate B is equivalent to adjacent mobile substrate A1.
    C i_cbGImmobile, cobble, boulder gravel. Substrate C is immobile gravel that forms topographic ridges where cobbles and boulders are piled upon one another and are separated by voids. It is identified on the basis of video and photographic images of mapped topographic ridges. It is present on the flank of Stellwagen Bank where it is associated with substrate B (36 to 58 m) and substrate D1 (50 to 83 m), and on the tops of North, East, and Middle Ninety Banks where it is associated with substrate D2 (87 to 105 m). It is equivalent to boulder ridges <1 m and >=1m on Maps A, E, F, and G.
    D1 i_cgS / pcbGImmobile, coarse-grained sand; partial veneer on pebble, cobble, boulder gravel. Substrate D1 is a layered substrate of immobile sand overlying immobile gravel on the flank of Stellwagen Bank. Depth range is 50 to 83 m. Mean weight percents per grain-size category: mud, 4; sand, 50 (fgS, 16; cgS, 34); gravel, 45 (G1, 11; G2, 34). Pebbles, cobbles, and boulders are identified on the basis of video and photographic imagery. Boulder ridges (substrate C) are present. Substrate D1 is similar to substrate D2 which lies at deeper depths (87 to 105 m) on the tops of North, East, and Middle Ninety Banks and has higher mud content (12 weight percent).
    D2 i_mcgS / pcbGImmobile, muddy, coarse-grained sand; partial veneer on pebble, cobble, boulder gravel. Substrate D2 is a layered substrate of immobile sand overlying immobile gravel on the tops of North, East, and Middle Ninety Banks. Depth range is 87 to 105 m. Mean weight percents per grain-size category: mud, 12; sand, 76 (fgS, 22; cgS, 55); gravel, 12 (G1, 8; G2, 4). Pebbles, cobbles, and boulders are identified on the basis of video and photographic imagery. Boulder ridges (substrate C) are present. Substrate D2 is similar to substrate D1 which lies at shallower depths (50 to 83 m) on the flank of Stellwagen Bank and has lower mud content (4 weight percent).
    E i_cgSImmobile, coarse-grained sand. Substrate E is an immobile sand deposit on the lower flank of Stellwagen Bank. Depth range is 66 to 122 m. Mean weight percents per grain-size category: mud 4; sand, 82 (fgS, 18; cgS, 64); gravel, 14(G1, 9; G2, 5). Boulder ridges are absent. Substrate E is similar in mud content to substrate D1 and contains more mud and fine-grained sand than substrate A2.
    F i_cgS / pcbGImmobile, coarse-grained sand; partial veneer on pebble, cobble, boulder gravel. Substrate F is a layered substrate of immobile sand overlying immobile gravel on the flanks of the Ninety Meter Banks. Depth range is 90 to 148 m. Mean weight percents per grain-size category: mud, 9; sand, 69 (fgS, 25; cgS, 44); gravel, 22 (G1, 13; G2, 9). Pebbles, cobbles, and boulders are identified on the basis of video and photographic imagery. Boulder ridges are absent. Substrate F is similar to substrates D1 and D2, except that F lies at deeper depths, and the partial veneer of coarse grained sand on the gravel is more extensive.
    G1 i_mfgSImmobile, muddy, fine-grained sand. Substrate G1 is an immobile muddy sand deposit in valleys between Stellwagen Bank and the Ninety Meter Banks. Depth range is 85 to 171 m. Mean weight percents per grain-size category: mud, 10; sand, 88 (fgS, 78; cgS, 10); gravel, 1 (G1, 1; G2, 1). Substrate G1 is similar to substrate G2 which lies at deeper depths (125 to 185 m) and has higher 4 phi sand (58 weight percent) and higher mud content (23 weight percent).
    G2 i_mfgSImmobile, muddy, fine-grained sand. Substrate G2 is an immobile muddy sand deposit in deep parts of valleys lying between the Ninety Meter Banks. Depth range is 125 to 185 m. Mean weight percents per grain-size category: mud, 23; sand, 77 (fgs, 77; cgS, 1); gravel, 0. Substrate G2 has the highest mud content of all substrates in quadrangle 6.
    geo_descr
    Text description corresponding to the geologic substrate attribute "geo_substr". (Source: U.S. Geological Survey) Character set (text).
    Substr_Mob
    Substrate mobility interpreted unit based on the presence of sand ripples observed in video and photographic imagery. (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
    ValueDefinition
    mobile sedimentRippled sand; equivalent to substrate A1.
    mobile and immobile sedimentRippled sand overlying immobile cobble and boulder gravel; equivalent to substrate B.
    immobile sedimentSand, sand partial veneer on gravel, and muddy sand; equivalent to substrates A2, D1, D2, E, F, G1, and G2.
    boulder ridges <1 meter in heightRidges <1 meter in height equivalent to substrate C.
    boulder ridges >=1 meter in heightRidges >=1 meter in height equivalent to substrate C.
    mob_descr
    Text description corresponding to the substrate mobility attribute "Substr_Mob". (Source: U.S. Geological Survey) Character set (text).
    sub_grain
    Substrate grain size interpreted unit based on the mean weight percent of the sand fraction. (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
    ValueDefinition
    fine-grained substrateMuddy sand in which fine-grained sand (3 and 4 phi combined) constitutes > 50 mean weight percent of the sand fraction; equivalent to substrates G1 and G2.
    coarse-grained substrateSand and sand partial veneer on gravel in which coarse-grained sand (2, 1, and 0 phi combined) constitutes > 50 mean weight percent of the sand fraction; equivalent to substrates A1, A2, B, D1, D2, E, and F.
    boulder ridges <1 meter in heightRidges <1 meter in height equivalent to substrate C.
    boulder ridges >=1 meter in heightRidges >=1 meter in height equivalent to substrate C.
    grain_desc
    Text description corresponding to the substrate grain size "sub_grain". (Source: U.S. Geological Survey) Character set (text).
    substr_mud
    Substrate mud content interpreted unit based on the mean weight percent of mud content. (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
    ValueDefinition
    <= 1mud content <= 1 mean weight percent, equivalent to substrates A1, A2, and B.
    >1 to 5mud content >1 to 5 mean weight percent, equivalent to substrates D1 and E.
    >5 to 10mud content >5 to 10 mean weight percent, equivalent to substrates F and G1.
    >10 to 20mud content >10 to 20 mean weight percent, equivalent to substrate D2.
    >20 to 50mud content >20 to 50 mean weight percent, equivalent to substrate G2.
    boulder ridges <1 meter in heightRidges <1 meter in height equivalent to substrate C.
    boulder ridges >=1 meter in heightRidges >=1 meter in height equivalent to substrate C.
    mud_descr
    Text description corresponding to the substrate mud content "substr_mud". (Source: U.S. Geologic Survey) Character set (text).
    Entity_and_Attribute_Overview:
    In the geo_substr attribute, weight percents described in the domain value definitions may not add to 100 due to rounding of values. Also in the geo_substr attributes, the mean weight percents for the units, sand is divided into two composite grades: fine-grained sand (fgS; 0.062 to <0.25 mm) and coarse-grained sand (cgS; 0.25 to <2mm). Gravel is also divided into two composite grades: Gravel1 (G1; w to <8 mm) and Grave2(Gs; 8 to <64 mm). This G1 and G2 are not to be confused with the geologic substrate units G1 i_mfgS and G2 i_mfgS.
    Entity_and_Attribute_Detail_Citation: Page Valentine, U.S. Geological Survey

Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)
    • Page C. Valentine
  2. Who also contributed to the data set?
    Public domain data from the U.S. Government are freely redistributable with proper metadata and source attribution. Please recognize the U.S. Geological Survey as the source of this information.
  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?
    Page C. Valentine
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Research Geologist
    384 Woods Hole Rd.
    Woods Hole, MA
    USA

    (508) 548-8700 x2339 (voice)
    (508) 457-2310 (FAX)
    pvalentine@usgs.gov

Why was the data set created?

This shapefile contains attribute fields that can be used to symbolically illustrate geologic substrate interpretation of the seabed in quadrangle 6 of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS) region. This interpretation is based on multibeam sonar bathymetry, multibeam backscatter imagery, video, photos, and grain-size analyses of samples collected from the seabed in the time period 1993-2004.

How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?
    DS469 (source 1 of 3)
    Valentine, Page C., Gallea, Leslie B., Blackwood, Dann S., and Twomey, Erin R., 2010, Seabed photographs, sediment texture analyses, and sun-illuminated sea floor topography in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region off Boston, Massachusetts: Data Series 469, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

    Type_of_Source_Media: online
    Source_Contribution:
    Original photographic imagery and sediment grain size analyses were used to interpret the seabed geology of the study area.
    SIM2840 (source 2 of 3)
    Page C. Valentine, editor, 2005, Sea floor image maps showing topography, sun-illuminated topography, backscatter intensity, ruggedness, slope, and the distribution of boulder ridges and bedrock outcrops in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region off Boston, Massachusetts: Scientific Investigations Map 2840, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: DVD-ROM
    Type_of_Source_Media: DVD-ROM
    Source_Contribution:
    Original multibeam sonar bathymetric and backscatter imagery were used to interpret the seabed geology of the study area.
    Video (source 3 of 3)
    U.S. Geological Survey, Unpublished Material, Bottom Video.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Hi-8 video tape
    Source_Contribution:
    Original video imagery of the seabed was used to interpret the seabed geology of the study area.
  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?
    Date: 2005 (process 1 of 8)
    A polygon shapefile was created in ArcCatalog (version 9.0) with a custom Mercator projection using the following parameters: central longitude -70 degrees 19 minutes; latitude of true scale 41 degrees 39 minutes; false easting and false northing, both 0; datum, NAD 83. Person who carried out this activity:
    Page C. Valentine
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Research Geologist
    384 Woods Hole Rd.
    Woods Hole, MA
    USA

    (508)457-2239 (voice)
    (508) 457-2310 (FAX)
    pvalentine@usgs.gov
    Date: 2010 (process 2 of 8)
    Interpretations were drawn on paper maps, which displayed the sun-illuminated topography with the locations of sediment grain size, with textural analysis, and video/photo stations. These paper maps were printed at a scale of 1:25000 on a large format HP plotter. The interpretation was based on seabed samples to determine sediment grain size distribution, photo and video imagery to identify small seabed features, multibeam sonar data to identify large seabed features and relative reflectivity (hardness and softness) of seabed sediments. The paper interpretations were transferred to ArcGIS visually based on background data layers in the GIS. The process was an iterative one, with the interpretation then printed on the paper maps with underlying bathymetry or backscatter, and interpretation lines adjusted based on the other data printed on the maps.
    
    
    The following information was used as guidelines to derive individual units.
    
    
    Individual sediment samples were aggregated into substrate types by comparing their textural composition, with special emphasis placed on:
    
    (1) mean grain size in phi units;
    (2) standard deviation from the mean of grain size distribution (degree of sorting) in phi units;
    (3) significant grain size(s) in phi units;
    (4) mud, sand and gravel contents in weight percents of the sample;
    (5) sand fraction subdivided into fine grained sand (3 and 4 phi) and coarse grained sand (0, 1, and 2 phi) in weight percents of the sample;
    (6) gravel fraction subdivided into G1 (-1 and -2 phi) and G2 (-3, -4, and -5 phi) in weight percents of the sample.
    
    
    Gravel pebbles larger than -5 phi (6.4 cm) were not collected in this study, although larger pebbles, cobbles, and boulders were observed in seabed imagery.
    
    
    Mobility of sediments was determined by the presence or absence of sand ripples, as viewed in video and photographic imagery.
    
    
    Substrate layering was determined by the presence of a layer of finer sediment overlying (but not completely covering) coarser sediment, as viewed in video and photographic imagery.
    
    
    This process took place over a number of years, 2005-2010. Data sources used in this process:
    • DS469
    • SIM2840
    • video
    Date: 2012 (process 3 of 8)
    In ArcGIS 9.3.1, slivers between polygons were identified and removed. Much of this work was accomplished using ArcToolbox - Data Management Tools - Feature Class - Integrate. Overlap between polygons was also taken care of often using the clip option from the editor menu discarding the overlapping portion. Further tweaking of the polygons was necessary. To maintain integrity between adjacent polygons, the remaining edits were done using map topology. Shapefiles don't have topology, but by using the map topology capabilities of ArcGIS, editing of shared nodes was possible. Person who carried out this activity:
    VeeAnn A. Cross
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Marine Geologist
    Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center
    Woods Hole, MA

    (508) 548-8700 x2251 (voice)
    (508) 457-2310 (FAX)
    vatnipp@usgs.gov
    Date: 2012 (process 4 of 8)
    The final piece of the geology interpretation was the already published boulder ridge data. The previously published ridge polygons (SIM 2840) were published as shapefiles in two separate data layers. One data layer consisted of boulder ridges < 1 meter in height, with the other data layer having boulder ridges greater than or equal to 1 meter in height. In edit mode in ArcGIS 9.3.1, the ridge shapefiles were copied and added (pasted) to the geology interpretation shapefile. With the ridges selected, the clip option was chosen from the edit menu to clip the underlying polygons and discard the overlap. Additionally, any ridges falling outside quadrangle 6 were deleted.
    Date: 2012 (process 5 of 8)
    The geology interpretation polygons serve multiple functions. With this in mind, the attribute table was constructed such that any of the geologic interpretations associated with quadrangle 6 could be symbolized from the single shapefile. For instance, the geologic substrate unit A1 is equivalent to the mobile sediment unit of the substrate mobility map. Additionally, geologic substrate unit A1, combined with several other geologic substrate units, comprises the single coarse-grained substrate. In this manner, the geologic substrate units can be used in various combinations of units to derive all subsequent geologic maps in quadrangle 6.
    Date: 2012 (process 6 of 8)
    The interpretation shapefile was projected from the custom Mercator projection to a geographic coordinate system using ArcToolbox - Data Management Tools - Projections and Transformations - Feature - Project. The output coordinate system was geographic, NAD83. No datum transformation was necessary.
    Date: 20-Jul-2018 (process 7 of 8)
    USGS Thesaurus keywords added to the keyword section. Person who carried out this activity:
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: VeeAnn A. Cross
    Marine Geologist
    384 Woods Hole Road
    Woods Hole, MA

    508-548-8700 x2251 (voice)
    508-457-2310 (FAX)
    vatnipp@usgs.gov
    Date: 08-Sep-2020 (process 8 of 8)
    Added keywords section with USGS persistent identifier as theme keyword. Person who carried out this activity:
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: VeeAnn A. Cross
    Marine Geologist
    384 Woods Hole Road
    Woods Hole, MA

    508-548-8700 x2251 (voice)
    508-457-2310 (FAX)
    vatnipp@usgs.gov
  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?
    Valentine, Page C., Gallea, Leslie B., Blackwood, Dann S., and Twomey, Erin R., 2010, Seabed photographs, sediment texture analyses, and sun-illuminated sea floor topography in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region off Boston, Massachusetts: Data Series 469, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

    Page C. Valentine, editor, 2005, Sea floor image maps showing topography, sun-illuminated topography, backscatter intensity, ruggedness, slope, and the distribution of boulder ridges and bedrock outcrops in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region off Boston, Massachusetts: Scientific Investigations Map 2840, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: DVD-ROM

How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?
  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?
    Navigation for all data upon which the interpretation was based used either differential GPS or GPS. These systems are assumed to have an accuracy better than 10 meters. Some of the data used in the interpretation relied on a towed system. Drift of the towed system was not accounted for. Additional inaccuracies are associated with how the interpretation was drawn in a freehand method. Based on this information, the interpretation is assumed to be accurate to within about 40 meters.
  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?
  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?
    This interpretation reflects complete coverage of the study area, quadrangle 6 of the SBNMS region.
  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?
    The interpretation was carried out by a single person and is consistent throughout the study area, quadrangle 6 of the SBNMS region. There should not be slivers between interpreted polygons, nor should the polygons have overlap.

How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?
Access_Constraints: None
Use_Constraints: The interpretation was completed at a map scale of 1:25,000.
  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)
    Page C. Valentine
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Research Geologist
    384 Woods Hole Rd.
    Woods Hole, MA
    USA

    (508) 548-8700 x2239 (voice)
    (508) 457-2310 (FAX)
    pvalentine@usgs.gov
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set? SIM3341_geologic_interp.zip containing SIM3341_geologic_interp.shp and the shapefile components as well as FGDC metadata and the browse graphic SIM3341_geol_interp.jpg. Additionally, the following ArcGIS 9.3.1 layer files are included: SIM3341_geologic_interp.lry, SIM334_geologic_sediment_mobility.lyr, SIM3341_geologic_substrate_coarseness.lyr, and SIM3341_geologic_substrate_mud_content.lyr.
  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?
    Neither the U.S. Government, the Department of the Interior, nor the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), nor any of their employees, contractors, or subcontractors, make any warranty, express or implied, nor assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, nor represent that its use would not infringe on privately owned rights. The act of distribution shall not constitute any such warranty, and no responsibility is assumed by the USGS in the use of these data or related materials. Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  4. How can I download or order the data?
    • Availability in digital form:
      Data format: This WinZip (version 14.0) contains the shapefile, browse graphic, and associated metadata. Additionally, ArcGIS 9.3.1 layer files are included for each variation of the mapping units. in format Shapefile (version ArcGIS 9.3.1) Size: 0.62
      Network links: https://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3341/data/SIM3341_geologic_interp.zip
    • Cost to order the data: None.

  5. What hardware or software do I need in order to use the data set?
    These data are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri) shapefile format. The user must software capable of reading this format. The data are available for download in WinZip format.

Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 08-Sep-2020
Metadata author:
VeeAnn A. Cross
U.S. Geological Survey
Marine Geologist
384 Woods Hole Rd.
Woods Hole, MA

(508) 548-8700 x2251 (voice)
(508) 457-2310 (FAX)
vatnipp@usgs.gov
Metadata standard:
FGDC Content Standards for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)

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